About Montessori

Maria Montessori

Developed by Dr. Maria Montessori in the late 1800’s, the Montessori method grew out of her careful observation of children and how they naturally learn and grow.

Dr. Montessori noticed something profound: even left free of adult agendas and ideas, young children naturally engage in their own development, seeking new skills as they master old ones, and building in complexity. Growing brains are still grappling with language, so small children learn best with sparse verbal instruction, through experiences, movement, sensations, and repetition.

Maria Montessori

The child is endowed with unknown powers which can guide us to a radiant future. If what we really want is a new world, then education must have as its aim the development of these hidden possibilities.

– Dr. Maria Montessori

Montessori In The Classroom

In a beautiful classroom sized just for them, children confidently pursue the skills and knowledge they need.

Guided by highly trained adults and surrounded by materials created to appeal to and support their stage of development, they are in the front seat of their education and social practice.

Montessori: A chance for the child to explore their natural curiosities

Overview

Centerpieces of the Montessori Experience

  • Pratical Life
  • Mathematical Mind
  • Sensorial
  • Language

What is Practical Life?

The everyday routines and practices of life such as caring for yourself and the enviroment.

The Mathematical Mind

In Montessori, mathematics lessons are more than numbers on paper.

Beautiful, interactive objects help teach through shapes, colors and physical examples of more advanced concepts.

Sensorial

Children use their senses to meet the world around them.

The sensorial materials in the Montessori classroom help the child become aware of details

Language

We read books and sing songs to play with words.

This oral language is the beginning.

Once a child has enough words to communicate well, we practice hearing the sounds that make up those words.

What is Practical Life?

  • The everyday routines and practices of life.
  • A chance for the child to explore their natural curiosities.
  • Care of self.
  • Care of the environment.

“Help me to help myself!”

 Children thrive when freely given the opportunity to care for themselves.

In community, children learn to love and care for their environment, like watering plants …

… scrubbing …

… using a mortar and pestle …

… washing cloths …

… and washing the leaves of plants

Mathematics

In Montessori, mathematics lessons are more than numbers on paper

Beautiful, interactive objects help teach through shapes, colors …

… and physical examples of more advanced concepts.

Size, weight, and color help children to see and feel quantities alongside written numbers

As concepts grow from simple to complex, the child transitions from concrete objects …

… to more abstract materials

The Benefits of Montessori

Child doing embroidery

We chose Montessori because it’s designed for children.

Language and socials skills flourish in the Montessori classroom’s three-year age span and freedom to work with their peers. Older students model positive group norms to younger ones, who then build self-confidence, regulation, and leadership as they in turn become classroom elders over the years.

An adult’s role in the classroom is modeled after Dr. Montessori’s approach as keen observer. Montessori teachers are rigorously trained to track and interpret each child’s individual development and present new materials as the child’s skills progress. With three years to build a relationship, an important bond grows between student and teacher to add trust, deep knowledge, and nuance to this work.